Frequency-Dependent Selection (Royal Society Discussion Volumes)
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Frequency-Dependent Selection (Royal Society Discussion Volumes)

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Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Evolution,
  • Science,
  • Population Genetics,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Life Sciences - Biology - General,
  • Science / Biology

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsB. C. Clarke (Editor), L. Partridge (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages182
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7738785M
ISBN 100521380014
ISBN 109780521380010
OCLC/WorldCa233525459

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Frequency Dependent Selection. Frequency dependent selection suggests that minority strategies may be beneficial as a result of interactions with qualities of the typical strategy: Consider a simple two-strategy game consisting of two types, exploiters and cooperators that due to their strategy are able to produce a surplus. Florian Loffing, Norbert Hagemann, in Laterality in Sports, Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection. Frequency-dependent selection describes “a process in which the survival/fitness advantage of a type is dependent on its relative frequency” (Takahashi & Kawata, , p. ).Negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) is at work if a type’s advantage increases as its relative.   Frequency‐dependent selection occurs when the fitness of a genotype depends on whether it is rare or common, that is, an individual's fitness is affected by allele or genotype frequencies of other individuals in the same population. Pathogen–host coevolution, sex ratio, self‐sterility alleles and mimicry are situations where frequency Cited by: 1. Frequency-dependent selection is an evolutionary process by which the fitness of a phenotype or genotype depends on the phenotype or genotype composition of a given population.. In positive frequency-dependent selection, the fitness of a phenotype or genotype increases as it becomes more common.; In negative frequency-dependent selection, the fitness of a phenotype or genotype .

Frequency-dependent selection may arise because the environment is heterogeneous and because different genotypes can better exploit different subenvironments. When a genotype is rare, the subenvironments that it exploits better will be relatively abundant. But as the genotype becomes common, its favoured subenvironment becomes saturated. Frequency-dependent Selection. Another type of selection, called frequency-dependent selection, favors phenotypes that are either common (positive frequency-dependent selection) or rare (negative frequency-dependent selection). An interesting example of this type of selection is seen in a unique group of lizards of the Pacific Northwest.   In principle, frequency-dependent selection gives a much more robust mechanism that can give an advantage to rare alleles, and thereby maintain variation. Even here, though, many of the proposed mechanisms require either strong selection or a delicate balancing of parameters, e.g., the Levene model (Levene ) or, more generally, Maynard.   Frequency-dependent selection favors phenotypes that are either common (positive frequency-dependent selection) or rare (negative frequency-dependent selection). We can observe an interesting example of this type of selection in a unique group of Pacific Northwest lizards.

frequency-dependent selection any SELECTION in which the FITNESS of genotypes is directly related to the proportions of the various PHENOTYPES present in a population, so that the frequency of the more common types is decreased and the less common types is increased. Such selection pressure often produces a stable GENETIC POLYMORPHISM and when it involves predation is referred to as . The Definition of Frequency-Dependent Rejection Abstract: The frequency-dependent rejection (FDR) terminology is frequently used in EMC analysis, especially in the report literature, and hence it appears useful to discuss it's general definition.   selection types, apostatic selection. Cite this entry as: () Frequency-Dependent Selection. In: Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics. The Colours of Animals is a zoology book written in by Sir Edward Bagnall Poulton (–). It was the first substantial textbook to argue the case for Darwinian selection applying to all aspects of animal book also pioneered the concept of frequency-dependent selection and introduced the term "aposematism".. The book begins with a brief account of the physical causes.